Cop Who Shoots Young Minority Male Sends Kaepernick Note He’ll Never Forget

On Thanksgiving Day, Colin Kaepernick attended an “Un-Thanksgiving” event on Alcatraz Island proving further his hate for America. It’s just the latest stunt that the former NFL Quarterback has pulled since the first time he took a knee on the sidelines last year to protest the National Anthem. Ever since that fateful day, numerous other NFL players have followed in his footsteps and have continued protesting during football games.

As a result of the protests, the NFL has seen a dramatic decrease in attendance and viewer ratings. Many fans have taken to social media to express their outrage with some going as far as to burn their apparel. Retired police officer Chris Amos decided to show Kaepernick and the other NFL player something they didn’t know: that they were more alike than he realized.

Chris Amos, a father of three, had the spotlight shone on him while he was still in uniform. Amos shot and killed a young minority male and was given paid leave.

He is exactly the type of police officer that Kaepernick spoke about when he said, “There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

Amos wrote Colin Kaepernick an open letter that he posted on Facebook. Those that have read the letter have claimed it is nothing short of spectacular. The full letter can be seen below.

An Open Letter to Colin Kaepernick,

Dear Colin guess you have been pretty busy these last few days. For the record, I don’t think any more or less of you for not standing for the national anthem. Honestly, I never thought that much about you, or any professional athlete for that matter, to begin with. I’ve read your statement a few times and want you to know I am one of the reasons you are protesting. You see I am a retired police officer that had the misfortune of having to shoot and kill a 19-year-old African-American male. And just like you said, I was the recipient of about $3,000 a month while on leave, which was a good thing because I had to support a wife and three children under 7 years old for about 2 months with that money. Things were pretty tight because I couldn’t work part-time. Every police officer I’ve ever known has worked part-time to help make ends meet.

You know, Colin, the more I think about it, the more we seem to have in common. I really pushed myself in rehab to get back on the street, kind of like you do to get back on the field. You probably have had a broken bone or two and some muscle strains and deep bruising that needed a lot of work. I just had to bounce back from a gunshot wound to the chest and thigh. Good thing we both get paid when we are too banged up to “play,” huh? We both also know what it’s like to get blindsided. You by a 280-pound defensive end, ouch! Me, by a couple of rounds fired from a gun about 2 feet away into my chest and thigh. We also both make our living wearing uniforms, right? You have probably ruined a jersey or two on the field of play. I still have my blood-stained shirt that my partner and paramedics literally ripped off my back that cold night in January. Fortunately, like you I was given a new one. Speaking of paramedics aren’t you glad the second we get hurt trainers and doctors are standing by waiting to rush onto the field to scoop us up. I’m thankful they get to you in seconds. It only took them about 10 minutes to get to me. By the grace of God, the artery in my thigh didn’t rupture or else 10 minutes would have been about 9 minutes too late. We also have both experienced the hate and disgust others have just because of those uniforms we wear. I sure am glad for your sake that the folks who wear my uniform are on hand to escort you and those folks that wear your uniform into stadiums in places like Seattle!

Do you agree with Chris Amos’ open letter? Let us know in the comments.

H/T Conservative Tribune

 

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